FUJI-SAN. Ascent to the most famous mountain in Japan (part 2)
Also keep in mind that the climb from station 5 to station 8 will go faster than from station 8 to the top when it becomes especially debilitating and difficult.…

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TOKYO THROUGH THE LENS - THE MOST INTERESTING PLACES FOR A PHOTOSESSION (part 2)
QUARTER OF HARAJUKU AND HIS SUBCULTURES Fashionable and popular among Japanese youth is the Harajuku quarter. Japanese who are representatives of different subcultures gather here. It is especially colorful here…

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FEATURES OF REGISTRATION OF A TOURIST VISA TO JAPAN (part 2)
Firstly, the Japanese are more willing to give visas to tourist groups, and secondly, the cost of visa services for travel agencies will be much cheaper. HOW TO GET A…

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Edo period

TOURIST NOTES. ALL ABOUT RAMEN (part 1)

Ramen (ラ ー メ ン) is one of the most beloved dishes in Japan. This noodle dish in a broth sprinkled with filling has won the hearts of gourmets around the world and often tops the list of what tourists plan to eat when purchasing tours to Japan. So, let’s take a closer look at one of Japan’s national culinary treasures.

HISTORY OF RAMEN
Historians did not agree on the date of the first appearance of ramen: what some consider the first primitive form of ramen, others do not recognize ramen and believe that it is too far from the modern version. According to information found in the Ramen Museum, some claim that this dish was eaten in Japan as far back as 1485 – based on extracts from the magazine of the famous priest (Inryokennichiroku), in which he claims to have served a Chinese ramen-like dish called “kaitimen” . Continue reading

Sakura blossom time (part 1)

Haaru, spring in Japanese, is the time of flowering of the “sakura” decorative cherry, which is associated with one of the most beautiful holidays of the Land of the Rising Sun. From the end of March to the beginning of April, Japan is completely transformed: hundreds of trees bloom everywhere with white and pinkish-white flowers, which makes it seem from afar that they are shrouded in clouds or covered in snow flakes. Every year, many people gather in parks, alleys, gardens, near palaces and temples to enjoy a truly beautiful and breathtaking sight. This custom is called “hanami” (from the words “hana” – a flower and “mi” – to watch), which literally means “viewing flowers”.

Sakura is the national symbol of Japan, which is devoted to many songs and poems. Continue reading

SKIING AND HOT SOURCES
Connoisseurs of ski resorts can easily call the advantages of Japanese pistes. First of all, it is fluffy and dry snow; then - relatively inexpensive prices. But many agree that…

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19 THINGS YOU CAN'T DO IN JAPAN (part 2)
8. DO NOT BE ABUSED WITH STICKS Before heading to Japan, learn how to use chopsticks (o-hashi). It is not that difficult. It’s enough to practice a little to impress…

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Canons of awakening (part 1)
Despite the rather mild winters, with the exception of the northern island of Hokkaido, the onset of spring in Japan is expected throughout the country. In addition to the usual…

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TRAINING IN JAPAN AFTER CLASS 11 (part 2)
The program of most language schools is designed in such a way that students begin to feel comfortable after a few lessons. Of course, this does not mean that knowledge…

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