FOR LOVERS OF FLOWERING SAKURA! SPRING NEWS FOR HANAMI AND NOT ONLY
Continuing the theme of sakura blossoms, we want to share with you the sweet novelties of the season, which you should definitely try yourself and bring your friends as a…

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19 THINGS YOU CAN'T DO IN JAPAN (part 2)
8. DO NOT BE ABUSED WITH STICKS Before heading to Japan, learn how to use chopsticks (o-hashi). It is not that difficult. It’s enough to practice a little to impress…

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Tea ceremony (part 1)
Among the unique arts, which in our understanding are inextricably linked with Japan, is the art of the tea ceremony, which means literally "tea with hot water" (cha - tea,…

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TOP-4 PLACES WHERE IT IS TO GO FOR WINTER (part 2)

As the festival developed, in addition to creating snow sculptures, other types of entertainment were added: concerts, food stalls, art exhibitions and ice-skating, cheesecake and snowmobile platforms.

If you go to Sapporo for a few days, be sure to take a stroll through the Odori park, which is the main venue of the snow festival, climb to the observation deck on Hitsujigaoka Hill, which offers a magnificent view of the city. There is a statue of William S. Clark, the first vice director of the Sapporo Agricultural School (now Hokkaido University).

We also recommend visiting the Sapporo Clock Tower, built in 1878, and the Nijo Fish Market, which occupies an entire quarter of the city. There you can taste the sea of ​​delicacies. Continue reading

Japanese New Year (part 1)

Until the distant now, 1873, Japan lived according to the Chinese lunar calendar. The favorite winter holiday of all children and adults was “moving” – each time it was a new day somewhere in late January or in the first half of February. However, the winds of change blew: under pressure from European powers and America, the country finally opened ports for free trade with foreigners. It became obvious that the difference in the time scales causes glaring inconvenience. And then the government voluntarily transferred the country to the solar calculation of days and months. At the same time, it was lost as much as thirty days: after the eleventh the first “moon” of the next year immediately arrived. The officials automatically lost their monthly salary – some were noisy, demanding to be issued nevertheless, but to no avail. Almost a century and a half has passed since then, and the Japanese have long been accustomed to celebrate the New Year at the same time as we, on January 1. Continue reading

TEACHING IN LANGUAGE SCHOOLS IN JAPAN - THE FASTEST WAY TO LEARN JAPANESE (part 1)
Getting a prestigious job, knowing the Japanese language, is not so difficult. But where is it better to learn Japanese and where to start? Oriental languages ​​are becoming more popular…

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AKIKHABAR - SOME MORE THAN JUST TOKYO TOURISM QUARTER (part 1)
Akihabara has long been a real mecca for lovers of manga and anime. There are many places where you can have a good time, and some are attracted by the…

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WINTER IN KYOTO
Do not let the winter cold ruin your mood! In winter, walks in Kyoto are filled with special magic. In addition, if you come to the old capital of Japan…

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Japanese language difficulties
Due to the difficult writing and vocabulary features, the Japanese language can become a stumbling block for even the most talented linguists. But now, it seems, the difficulties of the…

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