TEACHING IN LANGUAGE SCHOOLS IN JAPAN - THE FASTEST WAY TO LEARN JAPANESE (part 2)
HOW TO GET TO SCHOOL? Language schools are one of the best ways to discover the world of Japanese. Even those students who considered themselves weak after a few weeks…

Continue reading →

TOP 5 PLACES WITH NEW YEAR'S ILLUMINATION IN TOKYO
GARDEN EBISU To get better acquainted with Tokyo illumination, head to the Ebisu Garden, which is located in the Shibuya area. Here you will come across an exciting city landscape:…

Continue reading →

Tea ceremony (part 1)
Among the unique arts, which in our understanding are inextricably linked with Japan, is the art of the tea ceremony, which means literally "tea with hot water" (cha - tea,…

Continue reading →

forever remain

Sakura blossom time (part 3)

It is customary to gather for picnics not only during the day, but also in the late evening and even at night, because at this time the blossoming sakura is especially beautiful. In the parks and gardens under the trees, small lanterns called “wright-appu” are installed, which illuminate them from below, as well as tall lanterns made of “washi” rice paper, from which light gently falls on the flowers. Night hanami is called “Iosakura”, which means “night sakura.”

In the spring, when sakura blooms, a magical time begins in Japan. From all over the world, connoisseurs of beauty come here to enjoy the moment when the whole country is buried in white and pale pink colors. The splendor of flowering trees is difficult to put into words, however, like everything in this world, it is inconsistent. Continue reading

19 THINGS YOU CAN'T DO IN JAPAN (part 1)
Before heading to Japan, it would be useful to familiarize yourself with some cultural features in order to avoid insulting the feelings of the Japanese. Manners and social rules are…

...

SKIING AND HOT SOURCES
Connoisseurs of ski resorts can easily call the advantages of Japanese pistes. First of all, it is fluffy and dry snow; then - relatively inexpensive prices. But many agree that…

...

Japanese New Year (part 1)
Until the distant now, 1873, Japan lived according to the Chinese lunar calendar. The favorite winter holiday of all children and adults was “moving” - each time it was a…

...