IN JAPAN

Japanese New Year (part 1)
Until the distant now, 1873, Japan lived according to the Chinese lunar calendar. The favorite winter holiday of all children and adults was “moving” - each time it was a…

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Tea ceremony (part 1)
Among the unique arts, which in our understanding are inextricably linked with Japan, is the art of the tea ceremony, which means literally "tea with hot water" (cha - tea,…

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FUJI-SAN. Ascent to the most famous mountain in Japan (part 1)
The view from the top of Mount Fuji to the clouds floating at the feet is one of the most cherished spectacles that every tourist probably dreams of when he…

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19 THINGS YOU CAN’T DO IN JAPAN (part 2)

8. DO NOT BE ABUSED WITH STICKS
Before heading to Japan, learn how to use chopsticks (o-hashi). It is not that difficult. It’s enough to practice a little to impress the locals with their ability to deal with Japanese cutlery. Here are a few etiquette rules regarding chopsticks. Do not swing sticks over the dish, do not use them for pampering, for example, as drum sticks, do not point them at people. Always use two sticks; do not pierce food with one stick. Never put them directly in a bowl of rice and do not pass food to another person with the help of chopsticks – this will be considered a manifestation of a lack of education. Also, you can not use sticks in order to pull the dish to yourself. Do not lick or bite the tips of the sticks. Do not cross them in the shape of an “X”, do not put them on a plate. After stopping your meal, simply place the chopsticks in front of you on the left. Continue reading

19 THINGS YOU CAN’T DO IN JAPAN (part 1)

Before heading to Japan, it would be useful to familiarize yourself with some cultural features in order to avoid insulting the feelings of the Japanese. Manners and social rules are not universal, and it is easy to make a mistake if you do not know the customs of the country. The Japanese are reserved and polite, so tourists often do not even realize that they insult any of the locals. To help you understand the customs and traditions of the Land of the Rising Sun, we decided to introduce you to 19 rules that must be followed while in Japan.

1. REMOVE SHOES BEFORE ENTERING THE HOUSE
Let’s start with a simple one. Most people know that in Japan you need to take off your shoes before entering the house. Continue reading

TOP-4 PLACES WHERE IT IS TO GO FOR WINTER (part 2)

As the festival developed, in addition to creating snow sculptures, other types of entertainment were added: concerts, food stalls, art exhibitions and ice-skating, cheesecake and snowmobile platforms.

If you go to Sapporo for a few days, be sure to take a stroll through the Odori park, which is the main venue of the snow festival, climb to the observation deck on Hitsujigaoka Hill, which offers a magnificent view of the city. There is a statue of William S. Clark, the first vice director of the Sapporo Agricultural School (now Hokkaido University).

We also recommend visiting the Sapporo Clock Tower, built in 1878, and the Nijo Fish Market, which occupies an entire quarter of the city. There you can taste the sea of ​​delicacies. Continue reading

TOP-4 PLACES WHERE IT IS TO GO FOR WINTER (part 1)

OTARU
New Year’s holidays in Japan can become truly fabulous if you decide to visit the picturesque port city of Otaru. During the economic boom of Hokkaido, at the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th centuries, Otaru flourished, and many western-style buildings were built in the center of the port city. Many of them were later converted into restaurants, cafes, boutiques and museums. These establishments located on Sakaymatsi Street are very popular among tourists.

The program of most travelers necessarily includes a visit to the Otaru Canal, renovated in the 1980s, the annual Snow Light Path Festival, as well as the Museum of Music Boxes, where more than 25 thousand old and modern music boxes are collected. Continue reading

WINTER IN KYOTO

Do not let the winter cold ruin your mood! In winter, walks in Kyoto are filled with special magic. In addition, if you come to the old capital of Japan for Christmas or New Year, you will not have a single excuse to sit all day at the hotel.

To make your vacation easy and enjoyable, we have compiled a list of recommendations on what to do and where to go in Kyoto in the winter. Starting from hot springs (onsen) and ending with the New Year’s festival in a traditional Shinto temple. A trip to winter Kyoto will be remembered as an amazing acquaintance with unique Japanese culture. Continue reading

Tea ceremony (part 1)
Among the unique arts, which in our understanding are inextricably linked with Japan, is the art of the tea ceremony, which means literally "tea with hot water" (cha - tea,…

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TEACHING IN LANGUAGE SCHOOLS IN JAPAN - THE FASTEST WAY TO LEARN JAPANESE (part 1)
Getting a prestigious job, knowing the Japanese language, is not so difficult. But where is it better to learn Japanese and where to start? Oriental languages ​​are becoming more popular…

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Canons of awakening (part 1)
Despite the rather mild winters, with the exception of the northern island of Hokkaido, the onset of spring in Japan is expected throughout the country. In addition to the usual…

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Tea ceremony (part 2)
TEA ORGANIZATION Don't speak words Guest, host White Chrysanthemum. Tea ceremony The tea ceremony is surrounded by a special atmosphere, which the Japanese call "Wa". In everything, from the garden…

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